Scarlett Johansson in Under the skin [PICS & CAM Captures]. Click HERE.
'True Detective': Overrated or A Masterpiece? And [S2] Cast/Story Speculations. Click HERE to comment away.

Monday, September 16, 2013

stars, sex and nudity buzz : 09/17/2013

Meg Barrick in The Girl's Guide to Depravity

Tessa Harnetiaux in The Girl's Guide to Depravity

UPDATED 09/19/2013

Rebecca Blumhagen in The Girl's Guide to Depravity


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Damon Lindelof’s ‘The Leftovers’ Gets Series Order At HBO


In his follow-up to Lost, Damon Lindelof has received a 10-episode series pickup by HBO for drama pilot The Leftovers, which was directed by Peter Berg. Co-written by Lindelof and Tom Perrotta based on Perrotta’s book and toplined by Justin Theroux, the project takes place after the Rapture happens, but not quite like it’s supposed to. It is the story of the people who didn’t make the cut — and a world that never will be the same.

Warner Bros TV, where Lindelof and his Adventure Corps are under a rich overall deal, is producing in what marks the studio’s first series for HBO. The Leftovers, Lindelof’s first TV project after Lost, had a smooth sailing through development at HBO, where it was originally set up last summer, through pilot to a series order.

Like his fellow Lost co-showrunner Carlton Cuse, Lindelof picked cable for his next TV chapter after the Emmy-winning ABC drama. (Cuse is showrunner of A-and-E series Bates Motel and FX pilot The Strain.) Lindelof will serve as showrunner on The Leftovers, which he is executive producing with Perrotta, Berg, Sarah Aubrey, Ron Yerxa and Albert Berger. Berg and Aubrey’s Film 44 is co-producing. Co-starring alongside Theroux are Amy Brenneman, Christopher Eccleston, Liv Tyler, Chris Zylka, Margaret Qualley, Carrie Coon, Emily Meade, Amanda Warren, Ann Dowd, Michael Gaston, Max Carver, Charlie Carver, Annie Q, Paterson Joseph and Brad Leland.

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Danielle Harris, Katharine Isabelle Join Lionsgate and WWE Studios’ ‘See No Evil 2


The horror sequel directed by twin helmers Jen and Sylvia Soska has added two scream queens to its cast. Frequent final girl Danielle Harris (Hatchet II and III, and the Halloween franchise) and Katharine Isabelle (Ginger Snaps, Freddy Vs. Jason) will star in the chiller opposite WWE wrestler-turned-thesp Kane and Michael Eklund. Isabelle previously starred for the Soskas in their sophomore feature American Mary. See No Evil 2 picks up after the events of 2006′s See No Evil with psycho killer Jacob Goodnight (Kane) rising from the dead in the city morgue to prey on unsuspecting medical students. Lionsgate and WWE Films partnered on the first film which grossed $18M in theaters worldwide and cleaned up on home video. Lionsgate will handle worldwide distribution while WWE markets the pic through its multimedia network. Harris is repped by Sager Management. Isabelle is repped by Characters Talent Agency.

* Pretty sure Katherine Isabelle will have the usual horrible death scene. Here I thought Danielle was moving away from the slasher genre.

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Lorenza Izzo on The Green Inferno

Lorenza Izzo describes the language barriers and gory effects in Eli Roth’s new cannibal thriller.

Lorenza Izzo
The premiere of The Green Inferno was big news at the Toronto International Film Festival, due in no small part to director Eli Roth announcing the sequel Beyond the Green Inferno before it even premiered. For Roth’s return to horror directing, he assembled an international cast of actors to play college student activists in Peru who get captured by a cannibal tribe.  Lorenza Izzo stars in The Green Inferno as Justine, the newest member to join the activist group and the focal point of the tribe’s ceremonies. We met Izzo in Toronto the day after the premiere. We’ll be sensitive to spoilers, and I’ve even edited out some specifics since the movie won’t be made public for a while, but if you know jungle cannibal movies there are a few things you can count on.
 
CraveOnline: What was Eli looking for in the role of Justine and what made him see that in you?
Lorenza Izzo: I don’t know what he was looking for. He found me because we shot another movie called Aftershock before. We met down there in Chile where I’m from, I’m Chilean, and I think he just found Justine. More than Justine, he found a family he could shoot with. We literally, if you see Aftershock, you will see the whole cast transformed into the cast of Green Inferno so he found his whole movie right there and took it. Nicolas Lopez is the director of Aftershock and he basically, not stole, but borrowed his DP, his cast, his friends and took them with him and had Nicolas produce his film too.
 
So were there any auditions for Green Inferno?
Yes, of course, there were. We had other people join us and we call it Chilenize them. We created our own little group. Daryl Sabara who is amazing in the movie, it was such a pleasure to work with him, he’s one of the main guys. Kirby Bliss Blanton who was in Project X, Magda Apanowicz who is Canadian, she was amazing in it too and Aaron Burns, who is the man. He did VFX, he was holding the camera too, he was a camera operator and he was one of the main guys on cast too. So we had a really good mix of people. We were all sort of translating while we were in Peru so we had Chilean speaking Spanish and Americans so we were all helping each other out as we were moving from location to location.
 
But you were always Justine, no other character?
Yes, yes, yes.
 
Did you make friends with the Peruvian actors?
I did. That was quite a journey for me. I love kids. I always have. I was an only child until I was 12 and then my sister arrived. I kind of at the beginning hated her and would almost throw her out of her crib because I was so jealous. I know 12 is kind of old for that, but then I have this fascination and we got to work with these little eight-year-old villagers, little native kids. So I was obsessed with them. I would play soccer. We would get there really early in the morning. To get to the village, it was a 90 minute car ride. In total it was a five hour ride there so we got there exhausted, but we would get there really early. We all drove there together. So the cameras had to set up and so we had a while until we started shooting so I would play soccer with the kids. The families were amazing. I think the village really appreciated us being there and we really appreciated them working with us so the energy, the vibe of everyone together it didn’t feel like work.
 
Did they actually speak English, or at least Spanish?
They spoke Spanish. No English so we created a system of translation and there was Coco who was Eli’s assistant Peruvian AD so he was always with Eli. The villagers always had a constant communication with him and they loved him. Eli was really warm with the kids and with the families and what we call the Pussycat Dolls, the five elderly women who did all of the rituals. They were obsessed with Eli. It was really funny.
 
How did you approach Justine?
It was tough. It’s such a character that I was so excited to play. I really felt so attracted to her. Ariel Levy who plays Alejandro, he’s such an attractive guy. He’s Latin and he has an accent and he’s doing something for the world. It’s so easy these days to fall for these guys. She’s innocent but not really. She’s a really smart girl. You can see that she comes from a good family and she’s had everything in life and she sort of wants to give back. So I was really careful. I wanted to make her real because Eli, as you know, he’s very good at creating characters that are full and wanting people to really get what they are.
I was very stressed out because I want to give it all because Justine really holds the movie, the story, and I want to portray the most realistic way possible. I want to make everyone follow her and not think, “Oh my God, what is she getting herself into” because nobody would do that. It’s like, are you really going to go to the jungle? When Kaycee says, “Are you going to go bulldozer hugging?” I really agree with Kaycee. When I read the script, I was like, “I agree with her.” But no, not really. I would want to give back to the world so that was my main thing. I really wanted people to go with Justine and be like, “Yes.” I think I got a little payback at some point so I approached her, I just studied a lot.
 
Payback in the film or in real life?
In real life too. When we were shooting the movie, I think what really paid off for me, just going every day to the jungle, in New York, in Chile, I didn’t have to do much. I felt like I sort of became her and I was on the journey with her. The script kind of gave it all. It was just that. It was great.
 
Were you aware of the legacy of the girl in white tribal paint in the jungle movie?
Yes, I was. I studied that before and I was really attached to it. There are certain cultures you think you can get in and you can go and say, “What you’re doing is shameful” which is what Alejandro says, but what? What’s the limit? These kids who are in an Ivy league school think that they can go down there and attach themselves to these trees and defend them because they think they’re self-righteous and can do that, but until what point? So I think it’s such a smart way to approach all these society issues. I love that.
 
The white paint obviously represents something traumatic in the movie, but did you find it ultimately beautiful when you’re running through the jungle painted white?
It was beautiful. If you notice, they’re all painted in red and the contrast is green and there’s this little girl all painted in white. It’s all an artwork. She’s running through the jungle freely so it’s all kind of a beautiful story. In fact, when she first gets there, the elderly woman looks at her and she can tell. She’s a gift from the gods, the pure, clean one.
 
I also probably know Eli’s references. Did he give you movie homework?
Not really. He kind of wanted me to approach it in my own way. The thing about this movie is of course he has his influences. We all know about all these cannibal movies, and I did do my research because I can’t just come into this, “Oh, I’m going to do my own thing.” But it’s more about giving a cannibal movie to a modern audience and giving it in a modern sense too.
 
People don’t want to know who lives or dies, but it’s pretty bold of Eli to announce the sequel before the premiere. Let’s say, has there been talk of any of this cast returning for the sequel?
No. You know what? I was just as surprised and shocked as you were when I found out about the sequel. I was standing on the stage and right before, they were like, “There’s a sequel!” I’m like agh! What? Me and my manager were like, “What?” So yeah, I’m like you. There’s a sequel. That’s it. I have no idea. I think people have died so maybe there’s the returning of some zombie cannibals, I don’t know.
 
As a franchise, it could always be a new plane crashes with new passengers, or maybe a boat this time.
That could be really great. Our boat rides while shooting that, one day I thought we would not survive because the river overflowed and there were tree barks the size of from there to hear, and we were jumping up and down. The guy was driving the boat kind of drunk. I thought I was going to die. There were times I thought I was going to die, it was great.
 
One thing that occurred to me as I was watching The Green Inferno, what did it actually smell like down there?
Oh, that’s a really cool question. It was actually fresh and sort of humid at the same time. It was like this humid, really, really moist… does moist ring a bell, like wet clothes? But good wet clothes, not bad wet clothes. It wasn’t bad.
 
Even knowing all the gross stuff was fake, I was thinking it must stink.
Oh, let me tell you, the pig shit was real. In the cage, it smelled like shit. You can say that word for word, but you know, we got used to it. It worked. When Kirby’s going in the cage, “No, they’re going to put us in the pig shit!” They are. That was obviously set production but it was kind of pig shit.
 
What was their red paint made out of? I thought whatever they use for coloring must also have a scent.
No, the red paint was makeup effects but they made it with these different dusts and paprika or something. I don’t know. It didn’t smell. Now that I remember, we didn’t smell. We smelled really bad by the end of the day though because it was so hot and so, so sweaty. 110 degrees.
 
I think I smell bad by the end of the day here in Toronto.
I know, can you imagine there? But you know what? It also rained. That was the crazy thing about it and why the cameras, the Canon C300s worked so well because it would rain. It was 10 minutes of heat and sun and it would start raining. Then again, heat and sun and then rain again, and wild horses. So it was kind of insane.
 
What is next for you?
I have no idea. Whatever comes. I just shot a movie, a romantic comedy, completely the opposite, called Sex Ed with Haley Joel Osment.
 
Really?
Yeah, he’s so funny.
 
I know he’s been doing theater but he hasn’t been in movies for a while.
He’s back. He’s back.
 
Is he your love interest in Sex Ed?
Yes, yes.
 
I’m assuming.
Good assumption. So yeah, we are and I literally just wrapped that and I came here.
 
With that title, is it an R-rated rom-com?
It’s not. It’s just the title. He’s a sex ed teacher. It’s kind of really funny and sad. It’s the only thing he could get. He wanted to be a math teacher but it didn’t work out, so he’s now trying to make it as a sex ed teacher.
 
So it’s science fiction because they don’t teach sex ed in schools anymore.
There you go, that’s exactly what it is.

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Carissa Rosario Photo Shoot for Maxim en Espanol by Arthur St. John

Behind The Scenes on a Fashion Photo Shoot for Maxim en Espanol with Celebrity Model Carissa Rosario and Celebrity Fashion Photographer Arthur St. John.
Model
Carissa Rosario
CarissaRosario.com/
Facebook.com/RealCarissaRosario/
Twitter.com/CarissaRosario/
Instagram.com/CarissaRosario/
Photographer
Arthur St. John
ArthurStJohn.com/
FaceBook.com/ArthurStJohnPhotography/
Instagram.com/ArthurStJohn/
Twitter.com/ArthurStJohn/


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Aubrey Plaza : photoshoot by Dan Monick

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In Moments of Desperation (Short Film)

Starring: Lissa Hardbarger


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Are Movie Bloggers Ruining the Oscars?

are, movie, bloggers, ruining, the, oscars?, , The internet ruins everything. First it ruined marriage, then it ruined our foreign relations, and now, most gravely, it has ruined the Academy Awards. At least, that’s what Variety would have you believe. In a recent article covering the Telluride Film Festival, senior film critic Peter Debruge notes a recent change in how Oscar races unfold each year. With the rise of the blogosphere, more online journalists have begun attending major film festivals and delivering reports on their favorites for each year’s Best Picture. However, Debruge suggests these so-called “Oscar pundits” are nothing more than cynical handicappers, transforming the Academy Awards into a red-carpet horse race. His imperious dismissal of new media writers reflects the anxiety some traditional journalists have about the future of their craft. Yet rather than sully Oscar coverage, and contrary to Debruge's opinion, film bloggers actually help to popularize the traditionally elitist Academy Awards by allowing a more diverse audience to participate in the annual build-up. 

That build-up begins in early September with the Telluride, Venice, and Toronto film festivals. However, even among film aficionados, these are rarefied events: passes cost hundreds – even thousands – of dollars, to say nothing of travel expenses. But to miss out on this opening salvo of the Oscar season, is to miss out on a national, cultural conversation. In recent years these festivals have become cornerstones of the Best Picture contest. Prior to 2006, only four Best Picture winners premiered at film festivals: Annie Hall, Chariots of Fire, The Last Emperor, and American Beauty. Since 2006, the four most recent winners – Slumdog Millionaire, The King’s Speech, The Artist, and Argo – have all premiered at the relatively low-publicity Telluride festival. Now, thanks to the blogosphere, you no longer need to buy a plane ticket or a subscription to Variety to stay informed; you only need an internet connection.

Far from ruining the Academy Awards, film bloggers help maintain the appeal of the industry-driven event for a general audience. The Oscars remain one of the most watched broadcasts in America with around 40 million viewers each year. That steady viewership suggests that a significant portion of the population has a vested interest in who wins Best Director or Best Actress, if only to make a more informed decision as to which movie tickets deserve their $12.

Of course, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, along with Hollywood’s major studios, know the Oscars are an invaluable marketing tool: the “Oscar bump” can be measured in millions of dollars. Conversely, the Academy Awards, in maintaining their prestigious position over all other award shows, emphasize the show as directed by Hollywood itself: filmmakers celebrating other filmmakers. There is value in both approaches, and I would likely dismiss a “people’s choice” Oscar as quickly as I would dismiss an award based on box-office performance. But we need a third element – an impartial press – to hold the two disparate forces of creativity and commercialism in balance, so as to keep too much naiveté or too much cynicism from infecting the Oscars.

While traditional outlets like Variety and Entertainment Weekly can provide some evenhanded criticism, their own elitism often aligns them more with Hollywood’s infamously warped sense of self. Instead, writers and critics from established culture blogs, like Vulture or Deadline, down to those with their own Tumblr pages, can provide the kaleidoscope of opinions needed to ensure the Oscar race remains accessible for the average movie-goer. The internet helps us collectively celebrate when the Academy gets it right, and call foul when they get it mind-bogglingly wrong. Adding an element of general participation to the meritocracy of the Oscars does not corrupt the award show, but rather saves it from it’s own insular foundations. It takes a wide range of perspectives, on a scale only the internet can provide, to remind both the Academy and Hollywood that they can hand out all the golden statuettes they would like, but ultimately we decide which film is truly the year’s best picture.

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2013-14 Broadcast Season Preview: Challenges The Networks Face This Fall


The first new fall series, Fox’s Sleepy Hollow, premieres tonight, marking the unofficial start of the 2013-14 broadcast season. A slew of new shows and a legion of returning ones will unspool over the next couple of months. In the past, that would mean a bloody skirmish in every time slot, with one show coming out victorious and the rest in moderate or grave danger. Now with DVR and online viewing, several shows airing in the same time period can be popular. But will they all be successful? That is probably the biggest question facing the networks — how to translate eyeballs on different platforms into ratings and money from advertisers. While ad rates now are determined by C3 ratings that include playback (plus commercials) in the first three days after the premiere airing and the networks universally use Live+7 as ratings currency, Fox’s Kevin Reilly recently made a case for expanding the rating measurements to Live+30 and beyond and for including online viewing. In line with that, Fox this fall is introducing DVR and multi-platform lift projections for its shows. Meanwhile, CBS’ Leslie Moonves and David Poltrack recently proclaimed the decline of the adults 18-49 demo, which has been the key metric for advertisers. All that confusion opens the door for even more spin from the networks who can declare almost any show a hit using different viewing windows and demos. Maybe Netflix’s M.O., often criticized by its competitors, not to disclose any ratings data isn’t that bad after all. If the company considers it successful, it renews is, if not, it’s gone.

Back to the broadcast networks, which seem to be switching identities this fall. CBS’ highest-profile new drama, Hostages, is a serialized thriller vs. a classic procedural last year (Elementary).

Meanwhile, NBC, which made its biggest drama push with the heavily serialized Revolution last fall, is getting behind a procedural The Blacklist, which inherited Revolution‘s Monday 10 PM slot, this year. Multi-camera leader CBS is making a push in single-camera comedy with The Crazy Ones and We Are Men, while single-camera-centric Fox is reverting to multi-camera comedies with Dads. Here are some challenges each of the networks faces.

  ABC needs a hit, pronto. The network raised eyebrows with president Paul Lee declaring it “the No.1 brand in adults 18-49 as opposed to ABC’s ratings standing as the No.4 network in adults 18-49. While Scandal‘s sophomore rise has been one of the biggest success stories last season, returning only two series from last season, Nashville and The Neighbors, both bubble performers at best, is not a good record. The network put most of its eggs this fall in one basket, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., hoping that Marvel’s golden boxoffice touch will translate to TV. ABC also is searching for its first comedy hit since Modern Family.
  NBC had a great fall last year followed by an abysmal winter and better spring. The network boasts two of the most buzzed about new shows, drama The Blacklist and The Michael J Fox Show, which marks the TV return of the popular actor. Last year, NBC used the two-week coverage of the summer Olympics to promote its fall lineup. The network likely hoped to do the same this year with another two-week event, The Million Second Quiz show. Unfortunately, it fizzled. But NFL football seems as strong as ever and is sure to prop up the network’s schedule on Sunday with halo effect on Monday and Tuesday where NBC deploys its biggest hit, The Voice. Among the questions hovering over NBC — will the network’s already anemic Thursday comedy block withstand CBS’ expansion to two hours of comedy on the night once known as Must See TV. Will Chicago Fire have a sophomore growth spurt and is it established enough to successfully spawn a spinoff?
  Fox has had some of the earliest fall casualties in the past few years with Lone Star and Mob Doctor. Its fall is always challenging because of baseball pre-emptions, putting extra pressure on the new shows to find audience quicker. After taking a more niche approach in comedy for the last couple of seasons, Fox is betting on broader and lower-brow comedies this fall, including Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Enlisted and the controversial Dads. Will the change in direction pay off? After scoring a first drama hit in a long time with the very gory The Following, Fox is betting 100% on genre fare this fall with Sleepy Hollow and Almost Human, both of which coincidentally feature a severed head in the final scene of the pilot. After a string of misfires and cult shows like Fringe, will Fox finally find a new genre hit to succeed The X Files?
When CBS made a big bet in May on serialized drama with Hostages and single-camera comedy with The Crazy Ones and We Are Men, there was skepticism that this could be a gesture to show the creative community that the network is open to any genre before it goes back to its steady diet of procedurals and multi-camera comedies. But over the past two months, CBS scored a rare summer scripted hit with a heavily serialized drama, Under The Dome. Wisely, CBS aired the series in the Monday 10 PM slot, warming it up for Hostages, which will seamlessly follow Under The Dome next Monday. CBS’ long-term commitment to single-camera comedy is more of a question mark and will depend on the performance of the two canaries in a cold mine. CBS’ top prize this fall would be to successfully expand its Thursday comedy block.
The CW is taking a lot of risks this fall. For once, it is using its strongest launch pad, The Vampire Diaries, to introduce a soapy female drama, Reign. That is a genre that has struggled mightily on the network for years, which has only found success with genre shows like TVD, Supernatural and Arrow for the last few years. Also questionable was the CW’s decision to pit TVD spinoff The Originals against ABC’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. though the former’s premiere has been pushed back a few weeks and both shows will likely be heavily DVR-ed. Because of its younger skew, the CW is probably most affected by the younger viewers’ migration online, with TV ratings accounting only for a fraction of its total audience. The network’s Mark Pedowitz had been searching for a new system to reflect the large portion of digital viewing but a solution appears far off. Until then, take all ratings we report in the morning with a big grain of salt.

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I actually feel that I'm better friends with my pussy now (I'm better friends with my cunt now)

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6 Things You Should Know Before Hiring A Manager

By David Dean Bottrell
6 Things You Should Know Before Hiring A ManagerSometimes my students ask me for advice about talent managers. I’m never sure what to say since it’s a little like telling somebody who they should marry. In preparation for this column, I spoke to a few established talent managers (including my own) and everybody agreed that there are at least a few things every actor should understand (and think over) before working with a manager.

1. What’s the difference between an agent and a manager? Agents are legally bound to seek, submit, and negotiate for work only. They have larger client lists and act somewhat like brokers. Managers generally rep a smaller group of actors and have far more leeway to oversee and coordinate all aspects of a performer's career. A good manager will be focused not only on getting work for their clients but also on trying to elevating the actor’s career. They can also help a performer see the big picture. In the words of my manager, Judy Orbach, “If you’re an actor who wants to be considered for recurring or series regular roles, your manager should always be looking for ways for you to be seen in that light. Sometimes I’ll spot a role for one of my actors that may only be a few lines, but it’s a great scene with one of the stars of the show—in which case I would advise my client to go in on it rather than pass. A manager can help you build your resume by finding roles that are diamonds in the rough. Agents have larger rosters and less time to dedicate to developing your career.”

2. How do you find a manager? Most managers agree that the best way is through a personal recommendation from an agent, a casting director, a producer, or via another (non-conflicting) client. Once in a while, a cold mailing will work, but they are expensive and not as likely to pan out.

3. How can a manager specifically help you? A good manager will nudge your agents, help you bust down doors, and establish a clear identity for you among the casting community. A manager can help you focus on your goals and put them into motion. Talent manager, Neil Hassman adds “Managers rarely have competing category clients so the biggest benefit of management is knowing they're repping only you in your category. In addition, most managers are career architects and will guide you step by step in getting exposure, training, publicity, pictures, an effective reel, etc.”

4. How can you tell if a manager is right for you? Check out their client list on IMDb. Who do they rep? Do all of their clients look EXACTLY like you? If so, you might want to keep looking. Pretty much everybody agrees that you have to go with your gut reaction. Do you get along? Do you have similar ideas about what path to take? Like any other relationship, it has to feel right. If you’re new, don’t discount somebody who’s just starting as a manager. They are building their company and will definitely work hard for you.

5. What are the warning signs that your manager is not working out? No manager should ever ask for money up front for any reason. If they do, run. Agents and managers should only make money via commissions based on your earnings. If you find someone you like, but you’re not getting auditions after a few months, talk to them. See if there’s something more you could be doing. It’s a partnership.

6. What’s the best and most effective way(s) to work with a manager? Trust and patience are key. Even if you haven’t heard from your manager in a week or two, that doesn’t mean they are not doing their job. Adds Orbach, “Remember, if we’re on the phone with you, we’re not on the phone with casting!” Collaboration is key according to Hassman. “A smart actor is proactive,” he says. “They’re in class. They’re updating their photos and reels. They’re doing casting workshops and networking. A client who is out there honing their skills and keeping up their contacts is a manager’s dream.” Hassman sums up the best possible way to work with a manager: “3 Rules: 1. Participate. 2. Participate. 3. Yes, participate.”

In the last year, David Dean Bottrell has guest starred on “Mad Men,” “Save Me,” “Justified,” “NCIS,” “True Blood” and has appeared in two TV movies for Lifetime and the Hallmark channel. He is probably best known for playing the creepy “Lincoln Meyer” on “Boston Legal.” He teaches two popular acting classes in Los Angeles.

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Five Movies To Watch This Fall by Women Filmmakers

By on September 10, 2013
ErinHenriques new bio pic I may be writing this post in my underwear with a fan blowing in my face in my sweltering LA apartment…..but FALL IS HERE!  In an attempt to get myself inspired and geared up for the new season, I decided to take a look at some upcoming (and a few current) movie releases by women writers and directors.  Here are some films I’m excited about:

1. Wadjda

The story of a young girl living in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia who challenges social conventions when she attempts to raise enough money to purchase a bike in order to beat a neighborhood boy in a race.
I can not wait to see this film!  Not only does it look like a heartwarming story about a plucky heroine, but it was written and directed by the first Saudi female director, Haifaa al-Mansour.  It is also the first feature-length film to be shot entirely in Saudi Arabia. Wow!
Opens September 13 in NY and LA
Website:  http://sonyclassics.com/wadjda/


2.  Carrie

A retelling of the best-selling Stephen King novel.  We all remember the 1976 film adaptation directed by Brian de Palma and starring Sissy Spacek:  Take one outcast young girl, add her religious zealot mother, mix in some telekinetic powers and a prom, and voila…..a horror classic!
I’m not always a fan of reboots, but I’m excited to see director, Kimberly Peirce’s (Boys Don’t Cry, Stop-Loss) take on the story!  This is big-budget release for Fall, and it’s great to see a woman at the helm.  Not to mention, it has a great cast with Julianne Moore and Chloe Grace Moretz.
Opens October 18
Website:  http://www.sonypictures.com/movies/carrie/


3.  Ass Backwards

A road trip comedy about two lifelong friends who have a chance to redeem themselves from their unsuccessful child pageant days when they are invited back home for a 50th Anniversary pageant event.
This movie was written by and stars funny ladies, Casey Wilson (Happy Endings) and June Diane Raphael (Burning Love).  I’ve read reviews that compare this film to both Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion and Dumb and Dumber, and I’m all for it!  I love comedies where the female leads get to be the over the top, crass, silly characters (versus just being characters who react to the male over the top, crass, and silly characters).  Also, I love that this movie is about two women who love each other and root each other on (however hilariously misguided) instead of being in competition with one another.
Available on Video on Demand September 30th, Opens in theaters November 8th


4.  In A World

A vocal coach (who’s the daughter of a famous movie trailer voice actor) navigates her way through the male-dominated world of Hollywood voiceovers in pursuit of her dreams.
Okay, this movie was technically a late Summer release, but it’s too good not to include on this list.  Lake Bell (Children’s Hospital) won the 2013 Sundance screenwriting award for the script and also directed and stars in the film!  A heartfelt comedy about family, Hollywood, and female empowerment?  Yes, Please!
Now Playing.  This film was released theatrically on August 9th, but it is still playing in some theaters. Check out the film’s website for information about show times and future video release dates!  http://inaworldmovie.com


5.  First Comes Love

Filmmaker, Nina Davenport chronicles her decision to have a child as a single woman in her forties.
I was sick over Labor Day weekend and caught this documentary almost by accident on HBO.  It had such a great impact on me, I added it to this list.  First Comes Love is structured around filmmaker, Nina Davenport’s journey to motherhood, but it is ultimately also about family, community, and being an artist and a woman in the 21st century.
Now playing on HBO GO.  Check out the film’s website for information on future showings and video release dates. http://firstcomeslovemovie.com


So those are just a few of the movies that I’m looking forward to watching (or re-watching as the case may be) this fall.  Some other current and upcoming releases by female writers and directors include: Adore, The Lifeguard, Afternoon Delight, Enough Said, A Teacher, and Serena. If you have films you would like to add to this list, please post them in the comment section below.  As women in the entertainment industry, it is so important for us to support each other’s work.  Let’s get a dialogue going about what movies are out there!

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* as usual, Alison was effortlessly funny, insightful and explains why women should own their sexuality


Nerdist Podcast: Alison Brie returns!

Alison Brie just can’t get enough of the Nerdist podcast! Alison talks to Chris and Jonah about Community and Mad Men, crazy puppet shows, and the roles women play in the entertainment industry!

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Styria Official Trailer #1 (2013) : Eleanor Tomlinson



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Let’s Get Scared: Why Horror Movies Are Immune to the Digital Onslaught (Video)



Box office: Tentpole-obsessed Hollywood could learn a lot from the low-cost model of horror films


Horror fans got the memo long ago, and have no reason to waver now: Don’t watch alone.

While an onslaught of home-based entertainments erode moviegoing in general, there’s something about the communal experience of being scared that still attracts a crowd to multiplexes, experts say. The astounding success of “Insidious: Chapter 2″ once again proves that horror has become the movie business’ most durable genre.

“Horror movies play much better in packed theaters than they do in a living room by yourself — that’s the way people prefer to digest a horror movie,” Phil Contrino, senior analyst with BoxOffice.com, told TheWrap.

Horror movies are also extraordinarily cost-efficient; they rarely require extensive and pricey special effects or major stars. “Insidious: Chapter 2″ dominated the weekend box office, racking up $41 million and making back its $5 million production budget in its first full day of release. Financiers quickly announced plans for a third installment.

But it’s simply the latest in a steady stream of horror hits that have been scaring up big returns this year. “The Conjuring,” “The Purge,” Mama” and several other titles have all carved out a niche for themselves, despite being produced for a fraction of what most films cost to make.

“The Purge,” for example, cost a mere $3 million to produce, while “The Conjuring” required just $20 million. They made $64.5 million and $135.4 million respectively in North America, giving their studios the kind of capacious profit margins that are becoming an endangered species.

“It’s a genre that is less dependent on big budgets than other genres and that doesn’t need lavish marketing or explosions,” Bruce Nash, founder of the box office website The Numbers, said. “These kind of movies thrive on social media guerilla marketing and word-of-mouth support.”

The innovative compensation structure allows filmmakers to keep the costs down. For instance, Blumhouse Productions, which produced “The Purge” and “Paranormal Activity” in addition to “Insidious: Chapter 2,” pays its directors and top talent with profit participation in place of a big salary.

“You bet on yourself and if you deliver everyone gets rewarded,” Blumhouse Productions founder Jason Blum told TheWrap last summer shortly after the success of “The Purge.” “When you have people who are only getting paid if the movie makes money, it means everyone’s interests are aligned.”

It’s a structure that is lifted from Silicon Valley, where executives like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs traditionally preferred to take their compensation in the form of stock. It turned out rather well for them, too.

With the cost of major movies routinely topping out at between $150 million to $250 million, finding new compensation structures for Hollywood’s top stars could be critical. The makers of costly duds like “R.I.P.D.” and “White House Down,” which featured expensive stars like Jeff Bridges and Channing Tatum and still face an uphill climb to profitability, should take a note.

But there are other lessons as well.

While comedies also offer the shared experience of laughing in a theater, heavy dialogue and cultural differences make them a tougher sell overseas. Not so for horror, which translates easily. “The Conjuring” added $135 million to its overall haul from foreign territories and recent releases like the remake of “Evil Dead” and “Mama” essentially matched or even surpassed their domestic totals in overseas markets.

“The primal urge to be scared is just something that resonates worldwide,” Jeff Bock, a senior analyst for Exhibitor Relations, said. “Given that they play so well in other countries, it’s surprising there aren’t more horror movies made. They’re such a shot in the arm to the box office.”

The low-cost model employed by Blum is one that he and his disciples swear by. The cost constraints actually force the filmmakers to be more creative, and that shows in everything from how scary scenes are staged to the way studios use social media sites like Twitter to draw crowds.

And don’t look for the filmmakers to turn their backs on their low-budget past. Blum insisted to TheWrap that he did not equate the size of a film’s budget with success. Asked what he would do if offered $100 million to make any film, Blum replied, “I’d use it to make 35 movies.”

He’s not just a penny-pincher. After a summer that relied on bombast to lure the fickle teenage crowd, the breakdown of “Insidious: Chapter 2″s’ audience is instructive.

This was an R-rated film that appealed to and attracted a younger set on a wide scale. Sixty two percent of the audience were 25 years or younger, according to polling data released by the studio.

Of course, members of that particular demographic have many demands on their time and attention — one thing that the horror genre has done well is to make sure that audiences don’t have to wait long for new installments in their favorite franchises.

After all, a year separated the two “Insidious” movies and a new “Paranormal Activity” movie has arrived like clockwork nearly every year out of the past five (except 2013, though two are coming next year). It’s no accident that FilmDistrict and Blumhouse unveiled plans for an “Insidious” sequel before many theaters had finished tallying the ticket sales from last weekend.

“We live in an ADD culture,” Contrino said, “so if something is on a hot streak you have to strike fast.”

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Donyale Luna

Short Film based on Life of Donyale Luna Starring Singer Dia Bogan
Director: James Aveery


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Miss Russia 2006 Tatiana Kotova: Maxim [Russia]October 2013

imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com imagebam.com

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DirTyrion: 
Hey just wanted to ask, how come no one has posted Rebecca Ferguson's scenes from the episode that supposedly aired the day before yesterday? In Upcomingnudescenes it mentioned that in the 5th episode that aired on Sunday on Starz Rebecca was again nude, so it is weird that none of the usual suspects hasn't caught it already...
Also any new info on Young and Beautiful? It's one of my most anticipated movies along with Under the Skin.
Thanks


[1] Rebecca Ferguson nudity are so brief (less than 10 secs) it's pointless to encode them in single episode weekly format. I expect the vid-cappers are waiting for the season to end (or for BD Extended edition) before encapsulating the Becca nude scenes into one file. That's what I think happening here but having looked around for 'Uncut' Starz episodes on various forums without any success suggest something else at play here as well.
FergusonFerguson

[2] Are you asking about Young and Beautiful DVD/VOD release date? It's scheduled for first week of January 2014.
The Nudity Report by Mr. Skin:
Director Francois Ozon brought us Hall-of-Fame nudity from Ludivine Sagnier in Swimming Pool (2003), and much, much, MUCH more. His latest film, Young and Beautiful, may be one the most skinful features of the Fest so far, with an amazing 13 naked scenes from French model Marine Vacth.
Young and Beautiful
(0:01) Marine Vacth is on the beach in a bikini being spied on through binoculars. She takes her top off and we see some right breast from the side. Then a look at both breasts while lying on her back before her brother comes over to tell her she is being looked at and she puts her top back on.
(0:04) Marine Vacth masturbating in bed in her bikini bottoms as she straddles a pillow. (Much like Natalie Portman in Black Swan.)

(0:19) Marine Vacth is in bra and panties after removing her towel. Her buns can be seen through the panties.
(0:22) Pics of an escort on a website are supposed to be Marine Vacth. We see breasts, buns and underwear.
(0:27) Marine Vacth strips to bra. Her nipples can be seen through.
(0:28) Breasts on Marine Vacth then she is told to masturbate while the guy does.
(0:29) Marine Vacth throws her towel revealing her breasts and panties.
(0:33) Breasts on Marine Vacth in the shower washing. Brief buns when her stepdad walks in.
(0:37) Johan Leysen goes down on Marine Vacth in bed. We see her breasts in bed, then her breasts in shower.
(0:39) We see a montage of various partners that include another old guy going down on Marine Vacth. We see some brief left breast in bed.
(0:40) Marine Vacth is riding a guy in bed. We see buns from the side and a bit of breasts.
(0:44) Marine Vacth is riding a guy, we see breasts and a little bush. Then full frontal breasts and bush when she gets out of bed and then buns going back.
(0:48) Website pics again of what is supposed to be Marine Vacth with breasts, buns and underwear.
(1:22) Breasts on Marine Vacth while riding a guy.
 

[3] Better temper your expectations regarding Under The Skin until the flick is officially released and later on Blu-Ray. "Dimly Shot" is a red flag when it comes to nudity. The director also used 'choreographed' to describe the way nude scenes were filmed.

UPDATE

DirTyrion:
Hey again

Interesting what you said about Rebecca. Makes sense actually, but it is also strange that no Starz episodes have been uploaded yet (save for the premiere I think).

As for Young and Beautiful, thanks a lot for the info. I was not aware that Mr. Skin had detailed the scenes. I was looking for this as i am really looking forward to this movie. Apart from the obvious skinfulness and the beauty of Marine Vacth, like you I have a thing for these types of movies/scenes with May December relationships. Some of my favorite scenes are of this type.

As for Under The Skin - to tell you the truth, I had no expectations whatsoever for this film (I actually believed that she was liable to show more skin - without actual nudity - in Don Jon). So the news that she is nude in this (albeit in darkly lit format) caught me off guard, and now I'm excited to even be getting this.
Thanks again for the immediate response. 

PS- I believe we also share an Yvonne infatuation. Ever since I saw the first episode of Chuck, I've been in love with this woman, and even though I was disappointed at the "nudity" level of Dexter scenes, with her, I'll take whatever she's willing to give.

Something tells me we are in something special from Yvonne soon. She will break her nudity cherry for good possibly by next year. Yvonne is already part of Showtime family and unlike Maggie Grace, would be among the first name on the list if there is an opening for a recurring role. If MASTERS OF SEX becomes a sensational hit, Yvonne could be tempted to be part of the roster in Season 2. Remote but miracle tends to happen with unpredictable nature of our womenfolk. What I can confirm is that the pressure to be 'open-minded' and 'flexible' becomes a constant thorny presence when you are over 30 in Hollywood. We wait and see for Yvonne's next step in coming months. The holiday period is over. Time to go back to work via auditions for Aussie Missy.

You can always depend on the French (and Koreans) to deliver the goods. They never flinch away from brutally honest depiction of contemporary issues. If the script requires an old dude to bang the young gorgeous protagonist, by God they going to shoot it as described to maximize the impact. Marine Vacth is an exquisite beauty. It's going to be a major turn-on watching her writhing in pleasure and riding a guy old enough to be her dad.

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Syfy Acquires Canadian Werewolf Drama 'Bitten'

Thirteen episodes of the Laura Vandervoort starrer will air in 2014.

Bitten BTS Episodic - H 2013 
Syfy is expanding its relationship with Entertainment One.

The NBCUniversal-owned cable network has acquired Canadian original scripted werewolf drama Bitten, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

Based on the best-selling novels Women of the Otherworld by Kelley Armstrong, the supernatural thriller stars Smallville's Laura Vandervoort as Elena Michaels, the lone female werewolf in existence. The 13-episode drama will unspool on Syfy -- and Bell Media's Space in Canada -- in 2014.

The series follows Elena as she attempts to escape a world she never wanted to be part of as well as the man who turned her into a werewolf after she abandons her pack and takes refuge in a new city, where she works as a photographer and hides her werewolf existence from her boyfriend. When bodies begin turning up in her pack's backyard, she finds herself back at Stonehaven, the werewolves' ancestral domain where she wills top at nothing to defend her pack.

"Bitten is a fantastic blend of supernatural action, intense thrills, smoldering drama and a tortured love story that artfully adapts characters beloved for more than a decade by millions of readers around the world,” said Chris Regina, senior vp programming at Syfy. "It's an excellent complement to our roster of programming and we cannot wait to share Elena, her pack and their stories with the Syfy audience.”

Bitten, which co-stars Greg Bryk, Greyston Holt and Paul Greene, hails from No Equal Entertainment, Hoodwink Entertainment and eOne in association with Space and Bell Media. No Equal's J.B. Sugar, Hoodwink's Patrick Banister and John Barbisan and eOne's Tecca Crosby, John Morayniss and Margaret O'Brien will executive produce. Daegan Fryklind and Grant Rosenberg will executive produce the series and serve as co-showrunners.

"Our partners at No Equal Entertainment, Hoodwink Entertainment and eOne have brought to life a sexy and suspenseful new series and we are delighted Syfy has found it equally as compelling for their audience,” said Corrie Coe, senior vp independent production at Bell Media. "With a strong female lead at its core, we know audiences on both sides of the border will be rabid followers of Bitten."

Added eOne exec vp global production Carrie Stein: "The eOne team responded enthusiastically to Bitten because it’s a strong genre piece with a unique premise -- the first female werewolf in a pack of men. It’s a sexy, action-packed drama with a love triangle at the center -- all very appealing to the global audience.”

For eOne, the Bitten deal continues the independent studio's relationship with Syfy where it has drama Haven currently airing its fourth season. The series also marks eOne's latest U.S. entry, joining The CW comedy Seed, ABC'sRookie Blue, AMC's Hell on Wheels, DirecTV's Rogue and Discovery's upcoming first original scripted miniseries Klondike.

The series marks the latest Canadian import at Syfy as the cable network looks to firm up its lineup of original scripted programming for 2014. In addition to the second season of Defiance, Continuum and Ron Moore's Helix and more.

* aaaannnddd there goes the nudity out of the window. Oh sure, we're in for brief ass flash and side boobs. Just not the full nippy action from Laura. She went on and on and on about nudity....holy crap! The chick must be super prude.

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Slavery film heroic and harrowing, but necessary?



British film director Steve McQueen. (Reuters)As is becoming its wont, the Toronto international film festival seems to have delivered an Oscar frontrunner. By all accounts, Brit director Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave is a sterling piece of work; but that isn't the only reason it's attracting acclaim. The film is no mere romp like Argo or The Artist, crowd-pleaser like The King's Speech, or thrill ride like The Hurt Locker. According to McQueen, 12 Years is "necessary". (The Guardian's critic agreed that it's a "necessary" film, while a critic at the London Evening Standard found it "truly necessary".)

The film is deemed to be challenging, thought-provoking and powerful, forcing audiences to confront unwelcome but important realities. Understandably, it is therefore "something everyone should be obligated to see".

McQueen's film is certainly harrowing: people are thrown into carts like objects, and they are beaten, lashed and ceaselessly humiliated. It might remind you of Django Unchained. It's also a reminder that big-screen depictions of the wrongs once perpetrated on black people are in good supply these days. Lee Daniels's The Butler led the North American box office last month, while 42 has just opened in the UK. Supporting acts in Toronto this year included Belle and Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. In recent years, The Help, like Django, copped a best picture nod at the Oscars. So: successes. But what about the claim that it's "necessary"?

However searing it may be, 12 Years a Slave could hardly be less controversial. Racism hasn't disappeared, but one thing has changed utterly since the era in which the film is set. Discrimination on the basis of race is no longer acceptable in public; politicians who appeal to residual racist sentiment must deny they are doing so. The cause for which McQueen's film fights, long ago prevailed. Now, its function isn't to rub filmgoers' noses in unacknowledged guilt; it is to let us bathe in self-righteous satisfaction at our moral superiority to our woefully benighted forebears. Not surprisingly, even people of colour can find such exercises unnecessary.

McQueen might have looked to the history of slavery for the basis of a more disconcerting film. Black slavers could have been shown revelling in the practice. In the 17th century, thousands of British fishermen and coast-dwellers were captured by African pirates, clapped in irons and pressed into slavery. According to Samuel Pepys, they were fed only bread and water, they were beaten on the soles of their feet and bellies when their owners saw fit. Showing such conditions, though similar to 12 Years a Slave, might have yielded a more surprising and perhaps more provocative film.

A British director sticking it to Americans about their shameful history could have shocked them more than McQueen chose to. He could have flaunted the startling truth that it was Hollywood's pantomime villains, the limeys, who led the world in stamping out slavery. The British parliament outlawed the trade more than half a century before the American Civil War. And an account of William Wilberforce's 20-year struggle to abolish slavery might have been as instructive as Spielberg's wordy film Lincoln. The Royal Navy's subsequent war on the Atlantic trade could have yielded action yet more stirring than The Help's tale of a well-bred white lady's patronage of a couple of misused maids.

If the story McQueen offers instead has little bearing on current concerns, that's no more than par for the big-screen course. Preaching to the converted is the favoured cinematic approach to dispensing polemic. The film industry loves to jump on a righteous bandwagon, but only when it's safe to do so (and that is usually when the race in which the bandwagon is running has long ago been won).

The nightmare of Vietnam was thoroughly examined in retrospect by Hollywood, but not when the conflict was tearing America apart. The war lasted from 1955 to 1975: The Deer Hunter appeared in 1978, Apocalypse Now in 1979, Platoon in 1986, Full Metal Jacket and Good Morning Vietnam in 1987, Born on the Fourth of July in 1989 and We Were Soldiers in 2002.

In 2005, McCarthyism could be somberly dissected in George Clooney's Good Night and Good Luck. But when its evils were being perpetrated, Hollywood was participating in them, instead of exposing them. Poets laid bare the horrors of World War I as they were happening; All Quiet on the Western Front got round to them in 1930.

McQueen is considered an edgy, relevant director, but his forceful analysis of the rights and wrongs of the IRA hunger strike, Hunger, appeared more than a quarter of a century after the issues were actually urgent. Sex addiction, the theme of Shame, may sound like a hot topic, but it is of more interest to the prurient than to those concerned with genuinely pressing social problems.

If you want to see the real issues of the day confronted, try books, theatre or television. Mainstream cinema would rather wait until such issues no longer matter. Maybe economics make that inevitable, but let's be honest about it: McQueen's 12 Years a Slave may be engrossing and magnificent, but it isn't necessary.

White Slave



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[Screamfest '13] A Blood-Soaked NSFW Look At 'Schism'

Playing at this October’s Los Angeles Scremfest (Oct. 12 7:30PM), check out this extremely NSFW look at Schism, as well as some previously released stills that features star Vinnie Jones (Snatch, Midnight Meat Train) doing some menacing sh*t in a very Vinnie Jones way.

Schism was written by Adam Gierasch and his partner Jace Anderson (both who teamed for Night of the Demons and Autopsy), with Gierasch once again directing. Callum Blue (“Smallville”) and Ashlynn Yennie (The Human Centipede) also star in in the picture. This is a dark indie thriller in the vein of Jacob’s Ladder.

Shot on Super 16, “Our hero, Dylan White, leads an easy, if unambitious life: he has a good job that doesn’t require much thought and a girlfriend who wants only so much commitment. The world doesn’t demand much of him and he’s okay with that…until terrifying experiences intrude upon his everyday life. Are they visions, nightmares, glimpses into another world? Forced onto a journey of self-discovery that takes him into the seedy underbelly of crime-ridden New Orleans, Dylan discovers that his life is not what it seems.
schism [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism
Schism Still1 7 26 12 [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism
Schism Still2 7 26 12 [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism
Schism Still3 7 26 12 [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism
Schism Still4 7 26 12 [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism
Schism Still5 7 26 12 [Screamfest 13] A Blood Soaked NSFW Look At Schism

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NBCU-Backed Study: Online Piracy Continues to Rise Dramatically

Internet Piracy

With Capitol Hill lawmakers once again poised to scrutinize the state of online piracy, a new study commissioned by the entertainment industry shows a rapid increase in Internet infringement in recent years, to almost one-fourth of all bandwidth in North America, Europe and Asia.

The 100-page report from NetNames showed that infringing bandwith use rose by 159.3% between 2010 and 2012, or 23.8% of the total of all Internet use in the three regions. It also showed that 327 million unique Internet users “explicitly sought” infringing content during January 2013, a jump of almost 10% from November, 2011, and representing 25.9% of the total Internet user population in the three regions.

The report —- financed by NBCUniversal — is being cited by showbiz executives and some lawmakers as concrete evidence that despite stepped up enforcement efforts and a series of other measures, piracy is still persistent and even worsening. It was released on Tuesday, the day before a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing on voluntary initiatives that have been implemented between the entertainment industry and other industries, like Internet providers, ad networks and payment processors.

The report showed progress in fighting piracy in one area: Cyberlockers. The seizure of MegaUpload in January, 2012, followed by the closure of other direct download cyberlockers, showed “the ability of a successful antipiracy action to really have a disruptive effect on the ecosystem,” said David Price, director of piracy analysis at NetNames. According to the study, 338 petabytes of data was used for infringing uses on cyberlockers in the three regions in 2012, a decrease of 54.7% decrease from 2010. But the study showed increases in piracy consumption via BitTorrent peer-to-peer sites and video streaming.

Although Price said that the figures show how online piracy can react to events like “closures and seizures,” his report concluded that the “practice of piracy itself morphs to altered circumstances, with the use of video streaming and bittorrent escalating as direct download cyberlockers fell away.”

As of now, standalone anti-piracy legislation still appears unlikely, after the Hollywood lobby suffered a stinging defeat in January 2012 with the failure of the Stop Online Piracy Act, in the face of an unprecedented protest from Internet firms and users. But the dynamics could change, as the House Judiciary Committee has also launched a series of hearings on remaking copyright laws, undoubtedly touching on issues that could have an impact on anti-piracy initiatives.

Price said that the increase in infringing Internet use is going up faster than overall Internet consumption in North America, Asia and Europe. The report showed that video streaming consumption of all kinds rose by 170% between 2010 and 2012, but that consumption of infringing video streams rose by 470%.

Price said that the study did not count consumption of legitimate content on BitTorrent sites, nor did it include pornography.

Even before the report was released, there was some criticism from orgs that have often pushed back against stricter anti-piracy measures. Matt Schruers, vice president of law and policy at the Computer and Communications Industry Assn., expressed doubts in a blog post that the study would distinguish between legitimate and nonlegitimate BitTorrent traffic.

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The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms


Okay, this is just awesome. One Redditor photoshopped the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation into the original series uniforms, and the results are amazing. 

All of our love to deadfraggle and their delightful photoshopping skills, mainly because we want more more more more more. Let's add Wesley Crusher, Tasha Yar (in a dress!!!) Guinan and The Traveler. We beg you, do them all! Please!
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
The Star Trek: TNG crew looks amazing in Original Series uniforms
[Via Reddit]

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The Burnin Jacks - Touch My Soul (Uncensored)



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Feministe Needs to Face Up to Their Hypocrisy About Sex Work

Feministe‘s coverage of sex work is pretty seriously fucked up, and it is far past time that they face up to that and do something about it. I feel like that’s so painfully obvious that it’s embarrassing even saying it, but apparently it does need to be said.

In February, Feministe editor Jill Filipovic published a troubling post about how she supports sex workers, but hates sex work. When is the last time that you saw any marginalized person respond positively to the “hate the sin, love the sinner” line?

Filipovic’s post got a lot of criticism,1 but not as much as the guest post by social worker Sarah Elizabeth Pahman2 that went up last week.

There’s a lot wrong with Pahman’s piece, probably too much to adequately cover here. I’ve read it again and again, and every reading shows deeper problems in the author’s worldview and assumptions. In the end, there’s only one problem that matters: it should not, under any circumstances, have been published. Not by a major website that claims to stand for an intersectional vision of social justice. Not by anyone who claims to “support” sex workers. Not by anyone who values the voices of sex workers, or who thinks that they deserve to be centered in all debates about sex work.

The rot symbolized by the decision to run Pahman’s piece is not just about sex workers. It’s also about Feministe‘s (and in fact, the white left in general) persistent problems with racism and classism. The article is Pahman’s story of a being a privileged young woman who goes on a ridealong for the first time with a nonprofit that does outreach to low-income sex workers. They give out lunches and condoms and “bad date” lists and stepping away from the usual comforts of her privilege, for the very first time, this young woman sees the conditions that impoverished black and brown people live in for herself. And she decides that this experience, of seeing peoples’ lives from the security of a van, gives her the insight and authority to violently condemn the term “sex work” (Originally coined by activist Carol Leigh, aka Scarlot Harlot, who identifies as an “unrepentant whore”) and to describe her fantasies of violence against advocates of decriminalization:
Some may say “well that is why we must legalize it” and I want to spit in their face.  I want to grasp my fingers around their neck and choke the ignorance from them..  I guess violence begets violence because my eyes go red when feminists lecture about “sex work.”3
Sex work is talking in idealism, but I live down here in reality.  Sex work is saying “yes we have agency over our bodies and we choose this because we like sex and are empowered, we have enough money to live but like to do this as a job.  This work doesn’t cause PTSD because men treat us good and we have sexual equality.”
From beginning to end, it is a classic narrative of colonialism. It is the story of Victorian ladies who saw Native Americans going “naked” and found themselves filled with pity; it is the voice of Sally Struthers pleading on late-night TV for the starving children in Africa. Her language others not only the sex workers she describes, but all the inner-city residents whose conditions so move her. She resorts to metaphors that evoke an urban war zone like “the frontlines” and “in the trenches,” — a much-beloved motif of suburban whites who see cities as hostile and uncivilized.

While Pahman says in her very first graf that the group isn’t there to “save” anybody, her story is nothing but a white savior boldly venturing into the land of the savages. Not a single word of her post is actually about the people in the city; it is entirely about how seeing them makes her feel. The people themselves are exotic others, with as much substance as if they had been green-screened into the background.

Flavia Dzodan famously said, in response to feminist racism, “My feminism will be intersectional, or it will be bullshit.” It’s a perfect summation of something that every social movement — not just feminism — needs to take to heart. And all of Feministe‘s writers promote it as a core ethic.
But when the topic is sex workers, intersectionality goes out the window. The message given priority on Feministe is not sex workers talking about their lives, but privileged non-sex workers talking about how the very idea makes them feel icky.

Believe it or not, I do have a certain sympathy for Filipovic, Tigtog, and the other members of Feministe. Like them, I’m a writer who has never done sex work, and yet I frequently cover sex workers and their communities. It’s extremely hard to write about those things as an outsider with sensitivity and honesty. Even with the best intentions, there are scores of myths and stereotypes stacked up in our brains about what it means to have sex for money, and what kind of people do it. It is very, very hard to get the junkie hooker, the fallen woman, the sleazy gigolo, to shut up inside your head. But if you don’t want what you write to be one more piece of bullshit added to a mountain of bullshit that’s been piling up for centuries, that’s exactly what you have to do. You have to shut them up and listen instead to the actual people who are talking to you. I understand how difficult this can be. The odds are stacked against you because to get every single word out, you need to wade through centuries of sermons, religious tracts, penny dreadfuls, pulp magazines, tabloid headlines, quack psychology, gossip, political ideologies, pious moralizing, and gendered fear.

Sarah Elizabeth’s piece would have benefitted in particular from this kind of insight: it might be populated by people who have lives and aspirations and personalities, instead of racist and classist tropes from central casting.

The only way to beat the odds is to remember that whatever you have to say is secondary, even tertiary, to what the sex workers themselves have to say. Civilian writers like myself, Jill Filipovic, Tigtog, and Sarah Elizabeth Pahman have to accept that we are always sitting in the back seat when it comes to sex work issues, allowing the workers to drive. Our job is to augment their voices, not to speak for them.

And this is the point that Feministe consistently misses or systematically ignores, depending on how charitable you feel. They have repeatedly centered the voices of feminists who are not — and have not been — sex workers.

When people object to Feministe‘s treatment of sex work issues, Filipovic has responded with token acknowledgment. After her piece came under attack in February, she responded with a post titled “Centering Sex Worker Voices,” that is chiefly a rationalization for her original post’s claim that sex work wouldn’t exist in feminist utopia.4 She concedes, though, that she over-indulged in abstractions, and that there needs to be more focus on the voices of actual activists:
I want to highlight the voices of current and former sex workers who are actually out there getting shit done, even though they don’t have a place at the table when it comes to crafting the policies that most impact their communities. Talking about these issues in theory is fine. But we need to spend more time and exert more effort in supporting the women and men who are putting their own lives and liberties on the line by advocating for their rights.
All of which is excellent, and exactly what the Feministe staff need to take to heart. If they put action behind those words, I would be cheerleading with pom-poms and sparklers.

But in the time since Jill Filipovic wrote that post, she hasn’t even taken steps to make her own blog safer for sex workers, never mind the world. The sole action that Filipovic and the Feministe staff have taken to “highlight the voices of current and former sex workers” is a list of links in that same post.

Her response to people on Twitter who were angry about Pahman’s post was even more anemic: she said that Feministe would love to publish sex workers, and they were free to submit.

In other words, the editorial slant of Feministe is the fault of sex workers for not submitting their work.

It’s obvious that the real problem goes a lot deeper than that, no matter how much Jill wishes that it were that simple. It isn’t the responsibility of sex workers to establish Feministe as a safe place to talk about their activism. That’s entirely on the staff of Feministe, and for it to happen, they’ll have to do more than sit on their asses and wait for the submissions to roll in. Here are some examples of what sex workers were saying on Twitter:





There are many more. When your sole response to this kind of anger is “You can send us stuff, too,” you’re fucking up. Big time.

If Feministe‘s commitment to intersectionality isn’t a steaming load of bullshit, they’re going to have be the ones reaching out, not sex workers. Right now, I think that they’ve created an extremely hostile environment that presupposes that sex work is “icky,” and where sex workers are not regarded as the experts on their own lives.

I’m not going to go into too much detail about what Feministe and other blogs need to do to make sex workers part of their intersectionality. The whole point of writing this is that there are far too many people declaiming on what sex workers need, and I’m not playing that game. It’s up to Feministe to start looking at what sex workers are saying, and how they think their problems would be best solved.

And what they say should be the default, not the anger and hurt of a privileged white girl who has just seen poverty for the first time.

For an example of what to aspire to, Filipovic, Tigtog, and their colleagues might turn to the comments of Pahman’s entry. One of the few good things to come out of this whole clusterfuck is the comment by Kitty Stryker on why she identifies as a sex worker, and why she decided to do sex work. It is not just a more legitimate perspective than either Filipovic or Pahman, it is far better written. Kitty is one of the most ethical and honest people I know, and a hell of a writer. All of that shows here. In talking about her motivations and her life as a sex worker, she is realistic and straightforward, and no one could accuse her of whitewashing:
Sure, I would have rather chosen to go to school full time, get multiple degrees, work in an office around people who respected me for a wage that I could live comfortably on with health care- but I didn’t have that opportunity. I got the choice between state health care and sex work and time to go to school part time, or working 3 part time jobs, no time to myself, and constant panic attacks, disabling my body. So I chose what made the most sense for me under the circumstances, which is, in my experience as a sex worker and working with other sex workers as an outreach worker, a rape counselor and an activist, pretty common. You do the best you can with what options you have available. You have agency… sort of. Many of the people I spoke to were not forced. Not exactly. But their agency wasn’t coming from a place of 100% consent.
That said, it was not much different from those working with me at those minimum wage jobs. They weren’t there because it was a great job, but it was the best they could do with their limited resources. My girlfriend was sexually harassed daily at her mall job, and she had to stay there because she was afraid she wouldn’t get another job elsewhere.
And reading that, Feministe‘s editors should be asking themselves: Are they, as feminists, comfortable with the fact that the words of non-sex workers are at the top of the page, while thoughts like Kitty’s are buried under hundreds of other comments?


  1. For a really good example, check out Jadehawk’s rebuttal
  2. Sometime after the Feministe post went up, Pahman’s blog was marked “private” and blocked off. You can still find a 2012 interview with her here, in which she cites Melissa Farley as one of her inspirations. If you’re not familiar, Farley is an anti-sex work activist whose research has been so thoroughly debunked that it can comfortably be described as either fraudulent or grossly incompetent. 
  3. Since the piece was originally published, the violent language has been removed by Feministe‘s editors. However, it’s telling that a site which is so conscious of policing violent and abusive language as potential triggers allowed this through. 
  4. Political writers who are tempted to start basing critical essays on what utopia would look like should consider the etymology of the word. It was originally coined by Sir Thomas More, who made a portmanteau from the Greek words for “not” and “place.” Utopia is literally “nowhere.” Real activists have no time to deal with utopias, especially those that tell marginalized communities that they shouldn’t exist. 

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'Embrace of the Vampire' Trailer Goes Full-On "Buffy"!

Posted by MrDisgusting
Anchor Bay Films provided Bloody Disgusting with the exclusive trailer premiere for their erotic horror film, Embrace of the Vampire, starring Sharon Hinnendael (Rites of Passage, “Look”), Tiio Horn (Defiance, Hemlock Grove), C.C. Sheffield (“True Blood”), Chelsey Marie Reist (12 Rounds: Reloaded) and Victor Webster (Continuum). Available on Blu-ray/DVD Combo Pack and DVD October 15th, the trailer looks like a mix between Twilight and “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” with a heavy dose of sex and violence. I’m intrigued!
The film is a reimagining of the 1995 cult classic version starring Alyssa Milano, which will also be made available on Blu-ray for the very first time on the same day!
“Embrace of the Vampire stars Sharon Hinnendael as Charlotte, a timid and sheltered teen who has just left an all-girls Catholic school for a new life at a co-ed university. But an ancient evil has followed her here, tormenting her with disturbing nightmares and tempting her with forbidden desires. It is a hunger that can only be satiated by sensual pleasures of the flesh…and a thirst for blood. It’s a battle for her soul… and one she’s losing. But Charlotte is a fighter. The chaos and torment threatens to unleash her own inner beast, and anyone even close to her may find themselves embracing their own horrific fate.
For updates on the film, please visit the official Facebook page.

embrace of the vampire 1024x680 Exclusive: Embrace of the Vampire Trailer Goes Full On Buffy!
embrace of the vampire2 796x1024 Exclusive: Embrace of the Vampire Trailer Goes Full On Buffy!

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26-years old former beauty queen Shelley Hennig (and VisitorQ crush) in Zach Stone Is Gonna Be Famous

Ms. Hennig is a Capricorn. Stubborn and resolute. Deeply buried sexual mischievousness unlike Scorpios and very open Leos. Needs steady encouragement to bring it out. When it's out, it ain't going back in. Shelley is still trying find a solid footing in the biz after leaving the world of daytime soaps and probably thought time was on her side couple of years ago. After countless frustrating auditions and the implication she was on the wrong side of the 20's finally hits home, Shelley from Louisiana would have probably realized it isn't plain sailing to regular stint and work in La La Land despite her experience working on Days Of Our Lives for few years. The best and stable jobs are now on basic and premium cable. While she is likely seen as guesty and recurring act on the basic cable platform, Shelly would be welcomed with open arms if she is willing to compromise on those pesky non-nudity stance. Trust me when I say the cablers and the producers ain't too happy or eager to hire foreign talents all the time. Do you think they mind an actress with body like Shelley botching up during auditions round? Hell no! It's an aye the moment they see this made in USA perfect babe with stupendous curves walk in and test read for a nudity required role. So Shelley, what are you waiting for? Do the right thing, sweetheart - for yourself and pervs like me : )


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